Search by Topic

Join our mailing list!

Loading...

Thanks! You've been successfully signed up for the BTU newsletter!

January 1, 2013

Bus driver rushes son to hospital on double-decker

The Star

NORWICH, England — A bus driver rushed his son to hospital in his doubledecker after the lad had an epileptic fit.

Ross Cork swung into action when an ambulance for two-year-old Riley was delayed.

The 27-year-old had just dropped off all his passengers at a shopping centre when he got a call from his frantic wife, Lydia, telling him Riley was suffering a fit.

The tot, who has battled epilepsy since he was born, was at his grandad's home nearby and urgently needed to go to hospital.

Desperate Ross immediately phoned his boss at Konectbus to get the OK to rescue his son. Within minutes he had diverted his bus from its route on Saturday and was driving to go and get Riley.

"I drove that bus down some roads I didn't think I would ever drive down. I still can't believe I did it," he said.

Ross, from Norwich, said: "I keep thinking how lucky it was that I was in the city centre when I got the call.

"I could have been anywhere in Norfolk, but it just so happened I was five minutes away."

Lydia had dialled 999 and Ross arrived in the bus to find a rapid response car and paramedic at the scene.

But the paramedic warned him the ambulance had been held up 10 miles away.

Ross, who has been a bus driver for five years, put Riley on a back seat, got the paramedic and his wife on board and headed to Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

Riley was given emergency treatment and checked over before doctors eventually allowed him home in the early hours of Sunday.

Konectbus operations manager Steve Royal, who had to authorise Ross's mercy mission, said: "I've worked on the buses for 24 years and can say I've never heard of a bus being used as an ambulance."

Ross said: "It's a good story to tell Riley when he's older, that Daddy drove him to hospital in a double-decker bus."

Copyright 2013 Express Newspapers

Copyright © 2013 LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy

All Rights Reserved


Search